How to select the correct paintbrush

The right equipment ensures you get a great finish.

The right size for the job

12-25mm: Small jobs and touch-up work.
38mm: Good for furniture, small panels, window frames, trellises, mouldings, shutters and downpipes.
50mm: For small to medium size jobs, such as doors, screens, tabletops, railings and cabinets.
63mm: Handy size for outdoor furniture, cupboards, gutters, eaves and doors.
75mm: Choose this for medium to large areas like fence posts, skirtings, fascias and floorboards.
100mm and above: Ideal for walls, floors, ceilings, roofs, fences and any large, flat surfaces.

Long-handled cutter brushes

Specially designed for door and window frames as well as painting the corner sections of walls and ceilings. Frequently used to finish roller-painted surfaces.
2-sml.jpg
The right quality

Choose a brush with full-length hog bristles. The brush should also have a generous number of bristles (a good bristle pack). A quality brush holds more paint, provides smoother application and reduces paint spatter.

Matching paint with the right brush

For heavy oil-based paints and gloss, primers and varnishes use medium length bristles and solidly packed brushes.
3-sml.jpg
Acrylic (water-based) paints are best applied with longer, synthetic bristled brushes.
4-sml.jpg

Brush care and storage

For longer lasting lasting brushes, don’t: 



Stir paint with the brush
Leave the brush to soak for too long
Use a wide brush to paint narrow pipes and surfaces
Rest a brush on its bristles
Leave paint to harden on a brush

You should always:

Wash the brush in the correct solvent for the paint.
Then wash thoroughly in warm soapy water, rinse and shake off excess water.
5-sml.jpg
Comb bristles and hand shape while damp.
Hang up to dry.
Wrap in brown paper and store flat.